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Community Resources

NM Crisis Hotline: 
1-855-NMCRISIS

Southwest Family Guidance Center:
(505) 830-1871

APS Title 1 Resources for Families:
(505) 253-0330

ROOSEVELT MIDDLE SCHOOL COUNSELOR


Heidi Wolne MA LPC LPAT

APS Professional School Counselor

Roosevelt Middle School

wolne@aps.edu

281-3316

A. MONTOYA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COUNSELOR


Sarah Hadfield, M.A., LMHC, NBCC

APS Professional School Counselor

(505) 281-0880

Sarah.Hadfield@aps.edu

Counselor's Corner

Guidance and Counseling services are provided by a licensed mental health professional. Students, parents, teachers, and staff may consult with the counselor on a confidential basis. If a student is not feeling happy or successful at school, the counselor may be of help.
 

Services provided:

  • Consulting with community members
  • Individual counseling sessions with students upon referral
  • Small group counseling
  • Classroom guidance lessons at teacher request

When a child is referred for counseling services, the counselor will contact the parents/guardians before counseling sessions begin.

Meet the counselor to discuss any of the following:

  • Friendships & Relationships
  • Family changes
  • Grief issues
  • Mistreatment
  • Mediation
  • Safety concerns (for yourself or others)

Counseling News

Attendance Facts

Help Your Child Succeed in School: Build the Habit of Good Attendance Early

Did you know: 

  • Students should miss no more than 9 days of school each year to stay on track to graduation.
  • Absences can be a sign that a student is losing interest in school, struggling with school work, dealing with mistreatment or facing other serious problems.
  • By 6th grade, absenteeism is a sign that a student may drop out of high school.
  • By 9th grade, regular attendance is a better predictor of graduation rates than 8th-grade test scores.
  • Students can be chronically absent even if they only miss a day or two every few weeks.
  • Attendance is an important life skill that will help your child graduate from college and keep a job.

What you can do:

  • Make school attendance a priority. 
  • Talk about the importance of showing up to school every day. 
  • Help your child maintain daily routines, such as finishing homework and getting a good night’s sleep.
  • Try not to schedule dental and medical appointments during the school day.
  • Don’t let your child stay home unless truly sick. Complaints of headaches or stomachaches may be signs of anxiety.
  • Help your child stay engaged.
  • Find out if your child feels engaged by his classes and feels safe from mistreatment. Make sure he/she is not missing class because of behavioral issues and school  discipline policies. If any of these are problems, work with your school. 
  • Stay on top of academic progress and seek help from teachers or tutors if necessary. Make sure teachers know how to contact you. 
  • Stay on top of your child’s social contacts. Peer pressure can lead to skipping school, while students without many friends can feel isolated.
  • Communicate with the school. 
  • Know the school’s attendance policy.
  • Talk to teachers if you notice sudden changes in behavior. These could be tied to something going on at school.  
  • Check on your child's attendance to be sure absences are not piling up.
  • Ask for help from school officials, afterschool programs, other parents or community agencies if you’re having trouble getting your child to school.

"How are you Smart" : a great discussion to have with your kids.

Below is a video to introduce the idea of multiple intelligences. It is part of the advisory lessons taught by Ms. Wolne, and is applicable at any age.